the t.bone MB 75

Dynamic Microphone

  • Ideal for instrument pickup
  • For toms, amps, etc.
  • Polar pattern: Wide cardioid
  • Frequency response: 40 - 16,000 Hz
  • Max. SPL: 138 dB
  • Impedance: 560 Ohm
  • Field transfer factor [mV / Pa]: 1.7
  • Field transfer factor [dB re 1V / Pa]: -55.2
  • XLR output
  • Dimensions: 32 x 155mm
  • Weight: 254 g
  • incl. 6 m XLR cable included, microphone clamp and thread adapter from 5/8" to 3/8" in plastic case
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Audio Examples

 
0:00
  • Git Amp
  • Snare
  • Tom
  • Trumpet

Further Information

Condenser Microphone No
Polar Pattern Cardioid
Microphone Clamp Yes
Dynamic Microphone Yes
Complete Set No
1503 Customer Ratings
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This MB75 mic versus an SM57
gordonliv, 11.06.2013
It's never easy being forced to re-think your whole ethos on things like microphones. We're all told from day one in sound engineering that for snare drums, brass instruments, guitar amps and even vocals, the Shure SM57 is king. Consequently I have several of them, and have happily used them for years, thinking I was in the "can't go wrong" zone.

And then I had cause to buy a Thomann MB75, just for a small recording project that didn't really warrant getting another ‘57. So just out of interest, I thought I'd compare the MB75 with one of my ‘57s.

With the help of a friend, I recorded a snare drum track and a vocal track. Each track was recorded at the same time but with two mics - the MB75 and the ‘57. Then we solo-ed each track and did a comparative listening test, on both the vocal and snare track.

The MB75 won on all counts - on both tracks. I have to say, it didn't win hands down; it was a close-run thing. But it definitely won.

On the snare track, the MB75 had a warmer, rounder sound than the ‘57 with a slightly more pleasing mid-range. The ‘57 in comparison had a slightly honky sound with a nasal sharpness in the mid that would probably need a bit of EQ to smooth out. As I say, the differences were not huge, but they were definitely there. We even tried blind listening tests to make sure we weren't being influenced by knowing which one was which, and we did this by one person turning his back so he couldn't see which track was muted, then playing one track then the other. The two different tracks - and consequently the two different mics - were easily identified.

We did broadly the same thing with the vocal tracks. The same vocal performance was recorded with the two mics, and compared in an A/B fashion. The MB75 had a smoother sound without the pronounced mid that seemed to come through on the ‘57. We did both speech and singing, and the same was true for both. Although the differences were not huge, they were real and again, in blind tests, both mics were easily identified.

None of these differences were so great that the mics could not be made to sound identical with the judicious use of EQ, and of course some people may prefer the slightly more "middle-y" sound of the ‘57 rather than the smoother sound of the MB75 (although I can't think why - the MB75 definitely sounded nicer!). But of course if you rely on EQ to get the sound you want rather than have the mic do it for you, then you're using up valuable resources and processing power on your computer (or whatever multi-track device you have). In my humble opinion the closer you can get to the sound you want WITHOUT using your EQ, the better. This mic, surprisingly, gets closer to that sound for me than an SM57, on both vocals and snare drum.

We didn't do a comparative test on handling noise - given that a mic of this nature is hardly ever hand-held, we didn't think it was relevant. But, if it's of any consequence at all, the MB75 did feel a tiny bit lighter in the hand. But only by an ounce or so.

And then of course you look at the price! It kind of makes it a no-brainer, really. With the MB75 being about a quarter of the price of the '57, I'm really at a loss as to why I didn't buy several of these things years ago, and save myself processing power on my computer... not to mention hundreds of pounds!

This mic is highly, highly recommended. Excellent sound compared to an SM57 and truly amazing value for money! Go for it!
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Total
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Superb value and great sound
Rowland Straylight, 19.06.2020
These absolutely nail the home studio guitar cab mic role. Get a second for very heavy guitar and use in a fredman pair or a PRA628 for more conventional sounds and use this pointed right at the dustcap and the PRA628 at the edge. Better results and change left over from buying an SM57 or e906.

However, these skip the transformer, so they're not as loud as the SM57 they copy and can be a little noisier, but that's only noticeable if you're working on quiet sources. I might opt for the pricier Shure as a stage mic, but I'd definately have a few of these in the spares/extras box if I did.

They're a little bit brighter than an SM57, but that works to their advantage most of the time, particularly when used as a pair either in a 55degree fredman setup or as centre - edge on a guitar speaker as there's loads of brightness available if you want it.

The shock mount isn't any way near as good as good as the SM57, so it's worth usinng an external shock mount or spending on the real deal if you're dealing with drums or floor rumble.

I'm using a handful of these and a PRA628 along a with a vintage EV PL11, Unidyne 515, and a modern AKG Perception 200 to get an absolute wealth of really useful recordable guitar sounds. For the most part I'm leaning on these more than the more expensive mics as they so the thing so well.
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Excellent microphone
RichardH59, 04.05.2018
I bought a pair of these to add to my microphone collection which I use to record a four piece (Vocals, drums, Bass and Guitar) pop / rock band.

I have a Sure SM57 which I normally use to record the guitar amp and wanted something similar to use simultaneously but in a different position, or in conjunction with a bass microphone on the bass amp.

Being on a low budget and having had good experiences with T.Bone products previously (BD200 bass mic and HD990D 'phones) i took a risk on these which appear comparable with the SM57.

The MB75 arrives in a box virtually identical (except for the slip cover) as that which contains my SM57. The MB75 is virtually identical in size, weight and appearance to the SM57. They would be very difficult to tell apart if it were not for the identification mark on the capsule cover.

Included with the MB75 box is a decent XLR cable and mic stand clip adapter to allow fitting to a standard mic stand thread. Unlike the SM57 there is no soft case or mic stand clip provided.

I ran a simple A/B comparison between the SM57 and the MB75 using an electric guitar through a small guitar amplifier recorded into my Zoom R24 recorder. Playing the two tracks back there was no discernible difference in sound; both were clear and detailed.

Please bear in mind that, whilst I tried to keep everything (sound levels, gain, placement, guitar etc.) identical this was a non scientific experiment and your ears may be better than mine! However, in my opinion, the MB75 is a solid alternative to the SM57 at around a third of the price. The only con is the lack of a mic stand clip; a very minor point, especially since a XLR cable is included in the package. I would have no hesitation in purchasing more of these mics in the future.
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T.Bone MB75 - An SM57 for the economically minded.
Fragula, 27.11.2020
I use all sorts of mics, from a little "superscope" stereo mic that came free with a PC motherboard about 12 years ago, to an early 80's Calrec Soundfield CM4050 Mk.IIIa with the modular preamp/control system, some vintage 1950's British and German ribbon mics, 1960's Calrec (again) small diaphragm condensors, Shure, Beyer, and so on. Yet, through being introduced to them by friends over the last 20 years, I have become a lover of T.Bone mics, from the cheap and cheerful MB85, to the SCT2000. I started using these regularly about Ten years ago, and, apart from one EM81 drum overhead mic that went faulty, all have behaved impeccably, and done the job perfectly. This from 24 track studio down to home use, and including occasional gigs. In general, I recommend T.Bone mics, and /over/ the big name brands, because they are better value for money.

Basically. I recommend T.Bone mics in general, as a brand, and for all uses, from home, to high end pro studio.

Specifically about the MB75. I like /everything/, having used 4 of them, generally substitutes for a Shure SM57, and been quite impressed. Does the same job. Is /slightly/ different, seeming to have a little more clarity in the "low treble" range than "the real thing", but still the same general "body"and "thickness".. I specifically like these types in front of a guitar amp, snare, tom, or even the top end of a biamped bass rig. Where I want things to "roar" in a rock context generally.

The cons: Handling noise is much higher than the SM57, and, on a mic stand, it seems to pick up sub 120Hz (where I set the shelf when this happens) rumbles from nearby machinery (a tumble drier) quite well via the mic stand. Disproportionately even. I was barely aware of this sound via air and ears, yet via building and mic stand, it was fairly obtrusive. A high pass filter on the input of the desk at 120Hz fixes this, but if you don't have a HPF, you better find someplace quiet to record, and be aware of building/stand transmitted vibration. This is really the only con for me in practice, though the pair that arrived today were not tightly screwed together at the mid-body point. A little twist of the wrist sorted that before I even connected them to the preamp.

Given that mechanical noise isn't much of a problem for me usually, and I have the equipment/knowhow to fix this in an instant, I don't see a good enough reason to pay more for Shure mics, though some clients may be less impressed if/when they realise I'm using "cheap" mics, regardless of the fact that I am delivering the same tonal quality, but I'm not really chasing clients at the moment, and my other equipment has enough "impressive" value to more than negate this silly bias, so it's not an issue for me at all.

Why pay more?

Again. I have A/B'd these (in pairs panned L/R) with SM57, and the MB85 against SM58, and in general, prefer the T.Bone sound. But then I do have nice consoles with transformer balanced inputs and so on.. I could see perhaps why someone with a transformerless input desk might prefer the bandwidth limiting effect of the Shure's onboard transformer.

At the current price (£28), you can afford to try one out and see if you like it.

Suggestion for T.Bone though.. It might be an idea to do a "bare" version, like with the MB85, without the (very good) hard case and cable bundled, and at a similar price to the MB75.. And conversely, to offer a "deluxe" MB85 set with case and cable. (or just sell cases and cables seperately.. I'd go a couple of MB85 cases if you were to offer at reasonable price.
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